The Kitchen Planter

Even if you only have the tiniest of outside spaces  a  balcony, terrace, window ledge or the front entrance to your home, window boxes and containers can open up the world of gardening to you,  any space is  enough to create the perfect kitchen garden.  Plant up  hardy herbs together,  they will last all year round and will help inspire your winter cooking.  Those non hardy herbs that prefer a warm sunny clime, will thrive throughout the summer and  lend themselves nicely to the quick and easy oriental style and mediterranean cooking (much needed when life is too short and the days are too long to be spending too much of it inside).

Winter window box for the kitchen (think winter casseroles and slow roasts)

Bay, Rosemary, sage, thyme and oregano

These hardy herbs will last all year round – don’t forget to keep them watered during dry winters!

Spring to Autumn Window box for the kitchen – Semi hardy herbs  (feeling like a lighter meal,  think potato salad, fatoush, pasta or fish with creamy, herby sauces)

chives,  parsley, tarragon, mint

(will die off in a frosty winter if kept outside but will grow back again the following spring)

Summer window box for the kitchen (think mediterranean,  marinades,  salads  and quick and easy chinese and thai inspired stirfries)

lemongrass, basil, dill, corriander, chillies, spring onion and garlic

Enjoy the fruits of your labour

Grow herbs in a window box whatever size to suit your space

It’s amazing the variety you can pack in, your very own organic mini supermarket

Plant some herbs in a big wooden barrel or terracotta pot on your terrace or pop it at your front door, I usually dry out the abundance of hardy herbs they always come in handy in the store cupboard

Basil likes to stay inside when it is cold outside but will thrive outdoors in your window box during the summer months

Have a look at this great site selling unique trough containers – They not only look picture pretty but are great  for a small outdoor space to  grow your all your kitchen requirements

http://www.harrodhorticultural.com/HarrodSite/pages/product/product.asp?prod=GPL-695

Growing Lavender

If you have only the tiniest of window ledge,  providing it is a sunny spot,  why not grow lavender in a window box.  When you open your window the summer flowers will make you feel like you are in your own little garden,  bringing the outside in. Lavender also has many culinary uses, infuse in your tea,  make lavender cupcakes, lavender sugar and lavender vinaigrette.  Use the dried flowers to make lavender pot- pourri to use around your home or put in little muslin bags to freshen up your wardrobe or mix with some sea salt and olive oil to make a luxurious foot scrub.  Trim the lavender plants back by about a third each year after the flowers have faded and they will bloom for many. Lavender is quite tolerant to dry conditions and loves to be in the sun.  You will know it is summer when your lavender is in bloom, touch it, smell it, you will definately love it!

Grow Lavender in your window boxes

Infuse your tea

Create your own tea infusions, this one has green tea, camomile, hisbiscus, lavender and lemon

Bake some lavender cupcakes

Make some home made pot pourri – I pulled the lavender flowers from their stalks after they had dried out and mixed with some dried rose buds collected throughout the summer – you can also package these in little bags and tie up with ribbon – they make a pretty gift

Dried lavender also makes a great wardrobe fresher – pack in pretty bags and hang in your wardrobe

Keeps my wardrobe smelling fresh

The smell of lavender will keep months at bay

Here is a great link I found to explore the many more uses of lavender http://frugalgranola.com/2012/02/culinary-uses-for-lavender/

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2 thoughts on “The Kitchen Planter

  1. Frex says:

    Fresh herbs, great for cooking, would be also good if I can grow Thai Sweet Basil, is this possible in the UK?

    • fen says:

      yes it is possible, just like italian it will grow outside in summer, not as prolific, but can be grown from seeds or cuttings here in uk – perfect with lemongrass and chillies for a thai inspired window box

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